August 13, 2022

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Cinderella cried twice

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In an interview with him, Saud Hosni, an artist who touched hearts, said that he wept twice for Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser, when he decided to step down from the presidency after his defeat in June 1967, and the second time when he died in September 1970.
Saud referred to a 1996 conversation with him by journalist Mahmoud Matar, which was published that day in the Egyptian Radio and Television magazine, and was republished in his recently published book titled “Chot Hosni .. Details.” past years. ” Saud said of her crying over Abdel Nasser. , despite her fame at the time she never met once, her interlocutor answered a question to her, in which she said: “They exist. Those who believe that you built the Nazarene period and achieved your true glory in it.
Answering the question, Saud Hosni said that the artist was very angry with the tone of Nasserism and Sadatism: “I belong to the party of art and the common people who never forced me to submit my resignation. From their hearts because they chose me with their full will and awareness.”
However, Saud seemed worried when he responded to the question by saying, “Abdul Nasser was a popular leader who enjoyed people’s conscience and collective conscience, regardless of politics.”
It is worth noting that after the death of Abdel Nasser, Saud Hosni represented the film “Al-Karnaq” which dealt with some phases of the Nasser period from a critical perspective. On the one hand, I liked it as a work of art. , on the other hand because there were really corrupt centers of power that committed heinous crimes during the time of Abdel Nasser.”
“Al-Karnaq” is a movie based on the novel by Naguib Mahfouz, directed by Ali Badrakhan and starring Kamal El-Shennawi, Salah Zulfikar, Farid Shawqi, Nour El-Sherif and some great representatives of Egyptian cinema. The film was also included in the list of 100 Greatest Films of Egyptian Cinema. It deals with issues of the twentieth century, classified under the headings of political and intellectual tyranny and media blackouts.
A descendant of Shami’s grandfather and a beautiful woman born in Cairo’s Bulak district, Saud Hosni would become a transient star after her talent was discovered by the poet Abdel Rahman al-Qamisi; He cast her in his play based on Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” before director Henry Bargat cast her in the crew of his film “Hasan and Naima,” setting her on a path to artistic fame that remained after her tragic departure.

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