May 18, 2022

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"Tick Tock" prevents the release of new clips in Russia ... So what's the story?

“Tick Tock” prevents the release of new clips in Russia … So what’s the story?

Produced by: Wael Al-Ghoul
While reviewing the implications of the new media law signed by Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday, “Tic Tac Toe” announced the suspension of live broadcasts and the ability to upload and publish new video clips in Russia. What story?
Suspension of several services in Russia
In a series of tweets on Sunday, the application stated that “in light of the new legislation relating to misinformation, there is no other option but to broadcast live and release new content, and a study on the potential implications for security is pending.” “Tick Tock” employees and users of the social network.
In connection with AFP, TikTok did not specify whether videos released from abroad would still be available to Russian users.
A torrent of fake videos
During the Ukraine-Russia crisis, social media pioneers sought to publish videos on sites such as Tik Tok, Snapchat and Twitter.
One of them, 19-year-old Bree Hernandez, used Dictoc to search for makeup videos.
And the American newspaper The New York Times quoted the girl as saying: What I see on Tick Tock is more realistic than any other social media. I feel like I see people watching there.
But Hernandez saw on TikTok footage of Ukrainian tanks taken from video games, as well as an audio clip first uploaded to the app a year ago, according to a New York Times analysis of the videos.
According to a New York Times review, in recent days, hundreds of thousands of videos about the conflict have been uploaded into use around the world.
World War I “Tic Tac Toe”
The American newspaper described the Russian-Ukrainian war as the world’s “first Tik Tok war.”
The New York Times reported that the war had plunged Dick Tock into a difficult situation, with one event capturing a worldwide audience that uploaded a flood of videos, many of which went unrevealed.
According to the New York Times, this could lead to a variety of misinformation that has long dominated social networking sites and video sites such as YouTube, Facebook and Instagram.
Earlier, the Ukrainian newspaper Pravda published an audio clip of 13 Ukrainian soldiers on the island of Serpent in the Black Sea, in the face of a Russian military unit that told them to surrender.
The clip was later used in several TikTok recordings, some of which even mentioned that the Ukrainian players were all dead.
It was clear that the clips were incorrect and that the Ukrainian soldiers were alive and captured, but the tic-tac-toe clips had not been corrected.
Russia opposes misinformation
The developments come after the Duma approved a new law that would impose up to 15 years in prison for spreading false information about the Russian military and the war in Ukraine.
The announcement of the “Tick Tock” application comes a week after Russian authorities blocked access to Facebook in the country and restricted access to Twitter.
Owned by a Chinese company called Fight Dance, this application is one of the most popular applications worldwide, especially among young people, when the number of Tik Tok users exceeds one billion.

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