November 29, 2022

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Scientists throw model stars into a virtual black hole to see who survives

Look at the eight star skirt Black hole 1 million times the mass of the sun in this giant computer simulation. As they get closer, they all expand and disintegrate due to the gravitational pull of the black hole. Some completely break down into a long gas, a catastrophic event known as a wave turbulence event. Others are only partially damaged and retain some of their mass, returning to normal after horrific encounters.

https://www.youtube.com/watch؟v=5y2zERJrh9Y
Look at the eight-star models expanding and decaying as they approach the black hole a million times more massive than the Sun. The black hole tears some stars into a stream of gas, which is called a tidal phenomenon. Others were able to endure their close encounters. These simulations show that destruction and survival depend on the initial density of the stars. Yellow indicates the highest concentration and blue indicates the lowest intensity. The reason for him: NASAGoddard Space Airport / Taiho Rio (MBA)

Led by Taihu Ryu, a colleague at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Korching, Germany, this simulation linked the physical effects of Einstein’s general theory of relativity with real star density models. The mass of hypothetical stars is about one tenth to ten times the mass of the Sun.

The split between the fully exiting stars and the last remaining stars is not about mass. In contrast, survival depends on the density of the star.

Scientists throw model stars into virtual black holes

From left to right, this example shows four scenes of a hypothetical sun-like star approaching a black hole a million times larger than the Sun. The galaxy expands and loses its mass and then begins to regain its shape as it moves away from the black hole. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Aviation Center / Taiho Rio (MBA)

Rio and his team also studied how different properties of various black holes and galaxy proximity affect tidal events. These results will help astronomers estimate how many times full tidal waves occur in the universe and help them to produce accurate images of these tragic cosmic events.

Note: “The tidal waves of the main sequence stars. 1. Observable magnitudes and their dependence on the mass and darkness of the stellar hole” by Taihu Rio, Julian Krulik, Swee Bern and Scott C. Nobel, November 25, 2021, Astrophysical Journal.
DOI: 10.3847 / 1538-4357 / abb3cf

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