September 29, 2022

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Study refutes predictions of Earth's magnetic poles turning upside down |  Science

Study refutes predictions of Earth’s magnetic poles turning upside down | Science

The Earth’s magnetic field is unstable, and the magnetic poles rotate at intervals of about 200,000 years. Over the past 180 years, the strength of this sector has shrunk by about 10%.

A new study by a team from the University of Lund in Sweden has confirmed that the Earth’s magnetic poles are unlikely to flip in the future.

Come on this Study Published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) due to the appearance of a mysterious area in the South Atlantic Ocean, where the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field is rapidly decreasing, leading to speculation that it is moving towards the Earth. A magnetic polarity reversal.

A mysterious area in the South Atlantic Ocean where the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field is rapidly declining (Wikimedia Commons)

Current changes are not new

And step Lund University Report Released on June 7, the new study gathered evidence dating back 9,000 years, indicating that current changes are not unique and that this area off the coast of South America is characterized by a weak magnet in the South Atlantic Ocean. Its satellites failed several times due to the exposure of highly charged particles from the Sun, and the area became known as the South Atlantic Anomaly.

According to a university report, the Earth’s magnetic field acts as an invisible shield against life-threatening space environments and solar winds sweeping the atmosphere.

This magnetic field is unstable because the reverse of the magnetic poles occurs at random intervals, on average 200,000 years. According to the report, in the last 180 years, the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field has decreased by about 10%.

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Scientists have mapped the changes in the Earth’s magnetic field over the past 9,000 years (websites)

Diagram of changes in the magnetic field

“We have mapped the changes in the Earth’s magnetic field over the last 9,000 years, and the conflicts in the South Atlantic may be a series of events associated with changes in the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field,” says Andreas Nilson. Geological researcher at the University of Lund.

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The results of the study were based on the analysis of burnt artifacts, volcanic specimens, and central sedimentary craters, all of which contain information about the Earth’s magnetic field, including pottery heated above 580 C and lava. , And glacial deposits in lakes or seas.

These objects act as term capsules, carrying information about the magnetic field in the past. Using sensitivity tools, the researchers were able to measure this magnetism and reconstruct information about the direction and strength of the magnetic field at specific locations and times.

“Over the past 9,000 years we have developed a new modeling system that combines these indirect observations from different eras and locations with a global map of the magnetic field,” says Andreas Nilsson.

The sun's rays reaching the earth, creating the greatest heat in the tropics and striking at an oblique angle to the poles (solar warming) - role description
The disorder in the South Atlantic will disappear in 300 years, and the Earth will not be moving towards a polar change (Getty Images)

According to the report, by studying how the magnetic field changes, the researchers were able to learn more about the basic processes at the center of the earth that make up the magnetic field.

By comparing the measured and sample variations in the magnetic field, the new model can be used to date both archaeological and geographical records.

Conflicts will disappear and the polarities will not turn upside down

Assuringly, these results led the researchers to a final conclusion, “We expect the conflicts in the South Atlantic Ocean to disappear in 300 years and the Earth will not move toward a polar change,” says Andreas Nilsson.