August 12, 2022

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Ukraine, the refugee crisis and energy are at the center of the rotating president of the European Union's Czech Republic.

Ukraine, the refugee crisis and energy are at the center of the rotating president of the European Union’s Czech Republic.

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The Czech Republic, which assumes the rotating leadership of the European Union on Friday, promised to focus on the issue of support for Kiev, the refugee crisis and the issue of energy security. It is moving away from France at a time when Europe is facing major difficulties with full focus on ways to counter the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Observers warned that the Prague presidency was “not preparing for clear weather, but rather preparing for the difficult phase.”

The Czech Republic on Friday accepted the responsibility of the rotating leadership of the European Union, focusing on the time when Europe is facing difficulties. Ukraine.

In this context, Powell Halvesic of the Brock-based International Affairs Association warned that the presidency, which is moving from France to the Czech Republic and then to Sweden, is “not ready for clear weather, but rather for the difficult stage.”

The Czech government will receive European Commissioners for talks on Friday following a concert in the country of 10.5 million people that joined the EU in 2004.

Brock has promised to put at the center of its presidency the issue of assisting Ukraine from the refugee crisis to the reconstruction of the country facing Russian military aggression, but it also wants to focus on energy security in Europe. The Czech Republic, a staunch supporter of sanctions against Russia in the European Union, has been absorbing about 400,000 Ukrainian refugees since the start of the Russian invasion on February 24, and has provided financial and military assistance to Ukraine.

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Marshall Plan for Ukraine

Right-wing Prime Minister Peter Fiala recently said he was planning to hold a summit with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zhelensky, in which the application to join the EU remains weak, despite the support of the Western Balkans and Prague and other countries. Countries from Eastern Europe. However, this summit, which presents a kind of marshal plan for Ukraine’s progress, will not take place until the end of the war.

Jerry Behe, director of New York University in Prague, said the plan was unreliable. “Conflicts will not end until the end of the Czech presidency,” he said, adding that “the Czechs will be content to try to organize a summit in Ukraine and persuade others to continue to help this country.” Behe explained that the Czechs were not in a position to hold a debate on economic recovery or energy security because the exaggerated country had not yet joined the eurozone and relied on nuclear energy, which some members of the union, especially Germany, rejected. “It is difficult to provide leadership (in this country) in these areas,” Behe ​​said.

Doubts about the block … and questions about the rule of law

The Czech people have traditionally been skeptical of the EU, and only 36 percent of those polled in the STEM poll in March said they were satisfied with the EU’s work. Although Villa’s government is less skeptical of the group than some previous governments, analysts question its ability to distance itself from Budapest and Warsaw, which have close ties to the Wiskrat group, which includes Slovakia.

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Hungary and Poland have upset Brussels with their approach to the rule of law. Vera Jurova, Czech Vice President of the European Council, recently urged the government to take a clear stand on Hungary and Poland. But Behe ​​said: “I do not know how the Czech Republic can take a critical view of the two countries.”

France 24 / AFP